WPS Competition Rules

 

WPS Competition Rules                              Version 5; February 2018

Please start at the beginning and read these rules carefully, bearing in mind that this is not a legal document.  These rules are our best effort to describe how we run WPS competitions.

We ask all members of WPS to act ‘in the spirit of the club’ when entering their work.  If you have any doubts about eligibility or suitability of an image, please consult with the Competition Secretary.

Section 1 covers the rules that apply to all the competitions.

Section 2 describes the three types of competition organised by the club which are: Informal, Cumulative and Annual.  The competitions are described in more detail in Section 2.

Section 3 Covers the awards (cups and certificates) for the competitions.

Note 1: In the past, we have used Digital Projected Images and Projected Digital Images interchangeably to mean the same thing.  Since common usage seems to be ‘Digital Projected Image, we will use that term in the future and abbreviate it to DPI throughout this document.

Note 2:    In this document, the word “image” refers to both Prints and DPIs.

1    General Rules

1.1  Plagiarism

1.1.a    ALL images entered into WPS competitions MUST be the work of the author.

1.1,b    Composite images are permitted provided all component images meet this requirement.   Images from any other source including, but not limited to, royalty free image banks and clipart are not permitted.   

1.1c     Responses to requests for clarification will be based on Plagiarism in Photography – an interpretation by Christine Widdall AFIAP DPAGB BPE3.  (Reproduced at Annex A.)

1.2  Eligibility

1.2.a    Images must not have been created more than five years before the start of the current season.  This does not mean they must have been taken less than five years ago.  For example, you may enter an archived image that you now feel you have the skill-set to work up for competition purposes.

1.2.b    Images entered for any Cumulative Competition may not be re-entered in any subsequent Cumulative Competition unless they have been significantly and noticeably reworked.  This applies to Print->Print, DPI->DPI, Print->DPI or DPI‑>Print.  You may be challenged to describe the changes and possibly asked to withdraw your image.

1.2.c    Within the limit of the five year rule, images from any competition, other than an Annual Competition, may be entered for any subsequent Annual Competition.  (This means, for example, that a winning image from a Cumulative Competition may be entered in an Annual Competition.)

1.2.d    Any image placed 1st 2nd or 3rd in any of the annual competitions may not be entered in any subsequent competitions whether or not the image has been changed.

 

1.3 Competition Tiers

To encourage more members to enter their images and to improve over time there will be two tiers.  Tier 1 is for those members who are less experienced or feel they are not as skilled as those in Tier 2.  Tier 2 is for the more advanced or higher skilled members who have perhaps won a number of competitions, cups or certificates.  Those members with photographic awards such as LRPS or DPAGB or above will automatically be entered in Tier 2. Those members who decide on Tier 1 can move to Tier 2 if they are successful in competitions or feel they have improved over the season.  This change takes place at the beginning of the season only.  All members first joining a tier are to advise the Competition Secretary of their initial choice.

The following sections apply equally to Tier 1 and Tier 2, the only difference is that for Tier 1 the Judge will be advised not to demerit an image based on the style or size of the mount and only to mark down if the mounting is poorly executed, this should allow more freedom and the opportunity to keep costs lower.

 

1.4 Judging

1.4.a    With the exception of some Informal Competitions (see section 2.1), the judge will be asked to select 1st 2nd and 3rd placed entries;  Highly Commended and Commended  will be at the judge’s discretion.

1.4.b    All Cumulative and Annual Competitions will be judged by external judges.  Judges will usually be selected from the PAGB list of judges for the East Anglian Federation of Photographic Societies (EAF).  Every effort will be made to select an A-Panel judge for the Annual competitions.  (A-Panel judges are qualified to judge competitions at a regional level).

1.4 c    Wherever practical Tier 1 will be judged before Tier 2 and they will be treated as separate competitions.

1.5 Entries

Entries to all formal competitions both Print and DPI should be made via the Photoentry website    https://compent.photoentry.uk/compent/ this provides a secure method of uploading images that the Competition Secretary can manage and download. Photoentry is used by a number of clubs and has been thoroughly tested as secure and is backed up off site.

 

1.5.a    New users will receive an email from the website with a first use password and should login and change that password to their own choice of password. If there are any issues please contact the competition secretary. The website provides instructions for uploading titles and .jpg files.

 

1.5.b    Each competition is set up on the website in advance and the user will be able to see all competitions that are open and they are eligible to enter. Entries can be made at any point until the competition is closed, which will usually be midnight on the Sunday before the competition date unless otherwise advised.

 

1.5.c    There is no change to the format required for DPI’s, the website will check that the file meets the requirements. Print entries will require a similar .jpg file to be uploaded so that a score sheet can be printed off and the .jpg’s can be used for the website after the competition.

 

1.5.d    After a competition is judged the user can see their own scores on the Photoentry site and all scores on the WPS website.

1.6 Prints

1.6.a    After entering the print on the Photentry website prints should be delivered on the night of the competition as described below unless alternative arrangements have been made.

1.6.b    The longest side of a print (actual image area) must be no less than 20 cm (8 inches).  Prints must be mounted, but must not be framed or glazed.  The style of mount is unrestricted.

1.6.c    For Tier 2 entrants we strongly recommend the size of the mount to be the ‘standard’ of 40 cm x 50 cm.  (Entries not in standard sized mounts are usually not accepted for external (e.g.  RPS and PAGB) exhibitions or competitions.)

1.6.d    The back of the mount must be free from loose or rucked sticky tape to prevent damage to other prints.  ‘Dangerous’ prints will not be accepted for entry into a WPS competition.

Note.  Masking tape is NOT suitable for securing a print to its mount.  It is designed to be removable and becomes easily unstuck.

1.6.e    The author’s name must not appear in the image or on the front of the mount.

1.6.f    For all WPS Cumulative competitions, prints must be labelled on the back with the following information:

Member number.

Tier 1 or 2

Image title.

Name of Competition.  (Open Print 1 to 4)

Date of the competition.

1.6.g     For all WPS Annual and Informal competitions, prints must be labelled with the following information:

Member number.

Tier 1 or 2

Image title.

Name or theme of competition.

Section – If Appropriate (Monochrome or Colour).

Class – If appropriate (Portrait, Landscape, Natural or Pictorial & General).

Date of the competition.

Suitable labels are available from the Competition Secretary and a Word template is available for members who wish to print their own labels.

1.6.h    Prints must be delivered no later than 19:45 on the night of the competitionPrints delivered after 19:45 will not be accepted.

1.7  DPIs

1.7,a    DPIs should be properly sized, in the correct colour space (sRGB) and have the necessary metadata embedded.  Detailed instructions on how to prepare digital projected images are in the Articles section of the WPS web site under the heading “Preparing images for projection”.  (Reproduced at Annex B, please make sure you read this and follow the instructions).

1.7.b    Images that have not been properly prepared in accordance with 1.7.a will not be accepted.

1.7.c    Digital projected images should be entered on Photoentry as described in section 1.5

1.8  Subject Classes

The following descriptions are intended to assist members by providing clarification and guidance on permissible subject material for entry into the various competition classes.

1.8.a Pictorial & General

This is a ‘catch-all’ class for subjects that do not fall easily within the other classifications and allows a very wide range of photographs including studies in light and shade, patterns, etc.

Images that are more suitable to any of the other three classes should be entered in the appropriate class.  This class should not be used to squeeze in a third image that would more reasonably fit one of the following classes.

1.8.b Portraiture

Photographs of human form, more usually associated with facial close-ups or head and shoulder studies.

Full length and group photographs are acceptable.

Exclusions: Animals and representations such as sculpture.

1.8.c Landscape

A wide ranging classification that should depict an outdoor theme, generally illustrating a subject or location within the context of a natural environment.  Seascapes, Skyscapes, Cityscapes, Sunrise and Sunset are all included under the general description of ‘Landscape’.

1.8.d Natural History    

Natural history photography depicts living, untamed animals and uncultivated plants in a natural habitat, geology and the wide diversity of natural phenomena, from insects to icebergs.

Minimal evidence of humans is acceptable for nature subjects, such as barn owls or storks, adapting to an environment modified by humans, or natural forces, like hurricanes or tidal waves, reclaiming it.

Any manipulation or modification to the original image must be limited to minor retouching of blemishes and must not alter the content of the original scene.

Cute titles should not be used for Natural History images.

Exclusions      Photographs of animal which are domesticated, caged or under any form of restraint, as well as photographs of cultivated plants are ineligible.

Images with cute titles will not be accepted

Responses to requests for clarification will be based on the description of the Wildlife class in the definition of Nature Photography agreed by The Photographic Society of America (PSA), the Federation Internationale de Art Photographic (FIAP) and the Royal Photographic Society (RPS).  You will find the agreed definition of Nature Photography reproduced at Annex C and the full RPS article here:

http://rps.org/news/2014/may/nature-definition-agreed

 

2    Competitions

2.1 Informal Competitions

Informal Competitions are intended as an enjoyable learning environment where members may receive feedback on their images in a friendly way.  They offer an introduction to competitions for newer or less experienced members and members who wish to “push the boundaries” or try something out of the ordinary.

Some of these competitions may be judged by individual members of the society with experience of judging, others by the audience.  Images in some of the competitions may only be commented upon rather than scored.

Any image entered into an Informal Competition may be entered subsequently into any of the other competitions whether or not the image has been changed, 

There will be no certificates or awards for these competitions.

2.2  Cumulative Print and DPI Competitions

There are three open Cumulative Print Competitions and three open Cumulative DPI Competitions during the season which are held on alternate months.

The entries to these competitions may be colour or monochrome and the entries will not be split into the four classes.

Up to four images may be entered for each competition.  After the Judge selects the first 3 entries and any Highly commended or Commended, scores will be awarded as follows

1st =20 points, 2nd = 19 points, 3rd = 18 points, Highly Commended= 17 points, Commended = 16 points all other entries will be awarded 15 points

The two best scores per author for each competition will be accumulated across the season.  (This is not necessarily the same as their eight highest scores.)

At the end of the season a trophy will be awarded to the authors (Print & DPI) with the highest cumulative scores.

Any image entered into a Cumulative Competition may be entered subsequently into an Annual Competition whether or not the image has been changed.

2.3  Annual Competitions

The Annual competitions are run towards the end of the season and comprise Colour Print, Monochrome Print, Colour DPI and Monochrome DPI.  Each competition is divided into subject classes as described in section 1.7.

The rules for all four annual competitions are the same.

A maximum of four images may be entered in each of the competitions.

Within this limit, a maximum of two images may be entered in any one class.

The same image may not be entered in both Print and DPI competitions.

The same image may not be entered in both colour and monochrome competitions.

The judge will select a 1st, 2nd and 3rd placed image for each class and may award Highly Commended or Commended at their discretion.

The judge will then select the Print/DPI of the Year from the four class-winning images.

Finally, the judge will select the best Print/DPI landscape image from the winning colour and monochrome landscape images from both Tier 1 and Tier 2.  These two images (one Print and one DPI) will go forward to compete for the Dave Alden Landscape Shield.

 

3    Awards

Trophies and awards will be presented at the end of the season for Tier 1 and Tier 2.

 

3.1  Cumulative Competitions

3.1.a  Photographer of the Year (Prints)

A trophy will be awarded to the author who gains the highest cumulative number of points from their scores across the season.  (This is not necessarily the same as their eight highest scores.)

If there is a tie, the winner will be the author with the highest number of prints placed 1st.  If there is still a tie, the winner will be the author with the highest number of prints placed 2nd  and so on.

Certificates will be awarded to the authors who gain the three highest scores across the season.  (1st, 2nd & 3rd)

3.1.b  Photographer of the Year (DPIs)

A trophy will be awarded to the author who gains the highest cumulative number of points from their scores across the season.  (This is not necessarily the same as their eight highest scores.)

If there is a tie, the winner will be the author with the highest number of DPIs placed 1st .  If there is still a tie, the winner will be the author with the highest number of DPIs placed 2nd and so on.

Certificates will be awarded to the authors who gain the three highest scores across the season.  (1st, 2nd & 3rd)

3.2  Annual Print Competitions

3.2.a  Print of the Year

A trophy and certificate will be awarded to the author of the better print selected from the two winning prints of the Annual Colour and Annual Monochrome print competitions.

3.2.b  Colour and Monochrome Print of the Year

Certificates will be awarded to the authors of the best colour and best monochrome print from the Colour and Monochrome Print Competitions.

3.2.c  Class Winners of the Colour and Monochrome Print Competitions

Certificates will be awarded to the authors of the placed images (1st, 2nd & 3rd) for each of the classes in the Annual Colour and Annual Monochrome print competitions.

3.3  Annual DPI Competitions

3.3.a  DPI of the Year

A trophy and certificate will be awarded to the author of the better DPI selected from the two winning DPIs of the Annual Colour and Annual Monochrome DPI competitions.

3.3.b  Colour and Monochrome DPI of the Year

Certificates will be awarded to the authors of the best colour and monochrome DPI from the Colour and Monochrome DPI Competitions.

3.3.c  Class Winners of the Colour and Monochrome DPI Competitions

Certificates will be awarded to the authors of the placed DPIs (1st, 2nd & 3rd) for each of the classes in the Annual Colour and Annual Monochrome DPI competitions.

3.4  Dave Alden Landscape Shield

The Dave Alden Landscape Shield and a certificate will be awarded for the best landscape image (Print or DPI) from the two annual competitions.

The two winning images will be displayed on the society’s web site and members will vote for their preferred image by email.  The Shield will be awarded to the image with the highest number of votes.  The Club Chairman will not take part in this vote.  If both images receive the same number of votes, the Club Chairman will cast the deciding vote.

3.5  Progress Shield

The Progress Shield will be awarded to the member who, in the opinion of the Club Committee, has achieved the most progress over the last 12 months.

The Progress Shield will not necessarily be awarded every year.

 

Annex A

 

Plagiarism in Photography…Towards a Code of Conduct

An Interpretation by Christine Widdall AFIAP DPAGB BPE3, President L&CPU (Dec 2010)

What follows is not a legal document, but an essay on the subject of visual plagiarism.  I don’t claim that it is complete, only that it is my interpretation of a difficult subject and, as with many subjects, there are inevitably going to be grey areas that will cause further discussion and disagreement.  However, I hope that it will lead to a rather better understanding amongst photographic club members of what is and what is not acceptable in photography.

How do we define plagiarism?

The Oxford English Dictionary, Vol.  XI, Second Edition describes plagiarism as, “the wrongful appropriation or purloining and publication as one’s own, of the ideas, or the expression of the ideas (literary, artistic, musical, mechanical, etc.) of another.”

In other words, plagiarism is the act of putting one’s own name to another person’s work and that can be writings, ideas or visual media.  It is generally considered to have occurred when someone takes/uses another person’s work or part of someone’s work and makes it appear to be his/her own.  Plagiarism is not a legal term in the UK, but is always an unethical practice and essentially is a means of deceit (either intentional or unintentional).  When plagiarism does become the subject of legal action, it comes under the legally defined areas of infringement of copyright and/or theft of intellectual property.

When plagiarism breaks the rules of photographic competition, it may be subject to disciplinary action.

A first look at visual plagiarism

I want to introduce visual plagiarism by means of some examples:

Example 1.  Let’s say that I have produced a masterpiece of photography and I make a large mounted print.  You come along and photograph me holding my picture.  That is clearly not plagiarism…you are not trying to deceive someone into believing the picture that I am holding is your own work.  You have made a photograph of me holding a picture and there is no claim of authorship of that mounted picture implied in your photograph.  Any ambiguity may be laid to rest when you entitle it “Chris Widdall with her picture of…”

Example 2.

Now zoom in to the picture I am holding (or crop afterwards) to show only the picture itself.  Make a faithful copy of this and put it into a competition entitled “Chris Widdall’s masterpiece”.  You have made a record of my photograph and have titled it accurately to reflect that it is someone else’s work.  That is not plagiarism either.

Example 3.

Now take that same zoomed in picture of mine, change it slightly by adding a find edges filter, change the colour and tone a bit and give it a name of your choice.  I’m going to be very angry with you!  Because, whether you realised it or not, you have plagiarised my work.  The original idea and execution were mine and you have just taken my picture and changed it a bit without my permission and output it as your own.  You have infringed my copyright and possibly even my intellectual property rights.  Other people seeing that image think it is yours, but it is still my work, my original idea and my execution.  This equally applies to copying any piece of artwork, such as a painting or drawing or an advertising poster…the fact that it has no copyright symbol visible does not mean it is not protected by copyright.  “Copyrighted works may not be used for derivative works without permission from the copyright owner, while public domain works can be freely used for derivative works without permission.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_domain#Defining_the_public_domain

Work certified as “public domain” (not subject to private ownership) or “copyright free” may be used or copied without conditions and is not covered by intellectual property rights, no rights reserved, no restrictions on use.  There is no reason why you should not use such images in your own work, for your own enjoyment, or to learn how to make composites.  Magazines may circulate such images and encourage you to use them.  It might be easy to put such derived images into competition, even accidentally, but they are not allowed!

Even artwork that is circulated for people to use freely often has a “creative commons license”, which allows the original artist to keep copyright of their work, but share it with others under a series of conditions which they choose to apply.  http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/.  This automatically excludes it as legitimate material for you to use in competition, because it is not all your own work.  There are a number of sites on the internet where images are shared in this way and photographers and image makers are encouraged to share images and develop new work from them.  One such site is Deviant Art http://www.deviantart.com/.

There is no harm in this so long as you obey their rules…post your derivations with a link back to the original artist/photographer, but you cannot use such pictures in competition in your club, the L&CPU, the PAGB, etc.

Example 4.  Now make as close a copy of my photograph as you can that is entirely your own work, maybe the same location and different model, but essentially the same picture…you could have had the idea yourself, of course, but if my image is a bit “special” or “unusually imaginative” I might still claim that you had copied my idea too closely for it to be out of your own imagination and that could often be construed as plagiarism.  An interesting article at http://www.epuk.org/the-curve/visual-plagiarism highlights what happens when this type of plagiarism becomes the subject of litigation.

However, it’s a bit daft to imply plagiarism has occurred if you just happen to stand in a popular place to take photos, e.g.  of Eilean Donan castle.  Many people will come up with much the same picture and no-one can claim the original idea or the intellectual property rights.  The idea of a picture of a Goth on a gravestone would be an obvious subject if you visit Whitby at Halloween.  No-one has the right to say they thought of it first…and if you were there at the same time as me, we could have taken almost identical pictures.

Example 5.  Take inspiration from seeing my “wonderful creation”, but make something of your own that is influenced by my picture, but is developed with your own style and interpretation.  That is not likely to be plagiarism unless you follow my picture too closely.  It is probably true to say that art and photography would not have progressed as it has without people taking influence from others and then going on to develop their own work.

Some pictures inspired by others will be plagiarism and some not and it’s hard to draw a definitive non-fuzzy line between.  Similarity alone is not necessarily proof of plagiarism.  It is possible for similar creative inspiration to occur in different people at different times and when people work closely together with mutual knowledge of each other’s work, plagiarism may not have occurred at all.

Example 6.  Make a copy of my image, all your own work, and then change it in a way that parodies my work…usually parody is an exception to plagiarism, e.g.  French artist Marcel Duchamp made a copy of the Mona Lisa in 1919 and gave her a moustache and beard in a deliberate act of degrading and parodying a famous work.

Soooo….plagiarism is a complicated subject and therefore one that tends to confuse and/or enrage people, even when it doesn’t break the rules of competition! The best advice is NOT to copy others too closely…be inspired by them, yes, but don’t religiously copy.

Why do people commit plagiarism? Here are a few suggestions…

  1. They do not have the ability to think originally, so find it easier to “pinch” other people’s ideas.
  2. They love someone else’s work and want to make something like it, but get just a bit too close to the original.  It’s so easy to do.
  3. They do have an original idea, but need an element to finish the picture off and it’s easier to take something from the internet or a free cd to finish it off.
  4. They do it accidentally, not knowing they have transgressed.
  5. They do it knowingly thinking they won’t be found out.
  6. They do not see the boundary between being influenced by and directly copying other work and this is compounded by the fact that the boundary is fuzzy.
  7. They do not believe they are doing wrong.

When Plagiarism Breaks the Rules of Competition

When entering a competition, you should read the rules.  Writers of competition rules should also be clear what is and what is not allowed.  It would seem obvious that the work must be entirely the work of a single individual made from elements which he/she has the right to use in competition and has been captured by him/herself.  I am not sure that this is always stated, perhaps because it seems so obvious, but it is invariably the case!

Although plagiarism is always unethical it is not necessarily against the rules and often comes down to a personal matter between the alleged plagiariser and the complainant! and that introduces another level of complication.  There are many examples of work where a picture is so close to that of another photographer as to be easily mistaken for the original, but it has not broken the rules of the competition or exhibition

There have also been cases of individuals stealing images from the internet or from exhibitions and then passing the image off as their own.  This is clearly a very serious offence as it is plagiarism, theft, copyright infringement and against competition rules.  These cases, when discovered, tend to be dealt with very severely

If you are unsure about what the rules mean, ask for clarification before the event.  Prevention is better than cure! Be clear about what you have the right to photograph and use.

What will happen if I break the Competition Rules?

In the case of the discovery of infringement of the rules, the L&CPU, PAGB, BPE, FIAP etc will have their own method of dealing with this and may have a written policy to make disciplinary action fair to everyone.  It is reasonable to say that if, as a driver, you do 40 mph in a 30 mph limit, regardless of whether or not you knew the law, your speedo was inaccurate or it was accidental, you would be subject to punishment.  This principle is the same in photographic competitions.  However, mitigating information should be taken into consideration in addition to the severity of the infringement.  Sanctions may take the form of one or more of the following:

  • Explaining where the candidate has gone wrong with a warning not to infringe again and an explanation of what will happen in respect of repeated infringement.
  • · Disqualification of the whole or part of the candidate’s entry from the competition/exhibition.
  • · Ban from entering for a defined period or a lifetime ban.
  •  ·Rescinding the individual’s awards and distinctions.
  • · Reporting the infringement to other organisations.

FAQ in relation to photographic competitions

Finally, I have included some frequently asked questions and my replies relate particularly to the L&CPU competitions.  For other competitions, you must consult the rules/organisers.

  1. What if I take a photograph in the street and there is a poster, hoarding or other copyright work included in the picture?

This is generally allowed in competition because there is no deceit implied…it is clear you are not trying to pass off the copyrighted work as your own.  It is clearly just incidental and a “part of the scene”.

  1. May I use photographs of statues, models and stained glass windows in my pictures?

There is generally no deceit involved in any of these, so generally the answer is yes, you can use them.  This would tend to apply to other 3-dimensional objects.

  1. May I use stock photographs that I have bought or downloaded from the internet?

You may use them in your own work if the conditions of purchase/download say that you can but you may not use them in competitions.

  1. May I use copyright free images and clipart?

You may use them in your own work if the conditions of purchase/download say that you can but you may not use them in competitions.

  1. May I use images that have a “creative commons” license?

Creative commons licensing allows you to use images in defined ways and may require you to give credit to the original author in your derived work.  You may not use such images in competitions.

  1. May I incorporate part of a picture taken by my spouse with their permission?

No.  You may not use all or part of anyone else’s image.

  1. What about AV presentations?

This needs to be clarified by the AV community itself.  It is clear that some stories cannot be easily told without using historic material, which may still be covered by copyright laws.  Permission should be sought to use that material and the AV competition organisers should be clear about what may or may not be used.  Music is also subject to licensing rules.

© Christine Widdall 2010

 

Annex B

 

Preparing DPIs for Projection

September 26, 2011 at 12:14 am

This is a brief (but pretty thorough!) guide to the preparation steps for projected images, as we have some new members who will have missed the previous instruction sessions.

Image Resolution

The resolution of our club’s projector is 1920×1080. This does not mean that your images must be this exact resolution, but that your images should be resized to fit within those dimensions.  You must decide which way to scale your image, some software (e.g.  Lightroom) can handle this decision for you, but there’s a very simple set of “ABC” rules to decide how to scale your image, and it goes like this :

  1. A)If your image is longer in the verticaldirection (portrait format), then scale the height dimension to the projector’s vertical dimension of 1080
  2. B)If your image is longer in the horizontaldirection (landscape format) then scale the width dimension to the projector’s horizontal dimension of 1920  Now check your image, and if the resized image has a vertical (height) dimension exceeding 1080 pixels, go back to your original size, and instead use the procedure from step A.
  3. C)If your image is equidistant (square format) then follow the procedure from step A.

Simple!

Filling up the rest of the resolution area with a black background is not necessary, the projection software will do this automatically.  You can optionally add a border to your image, but this must still be within the bounds of the dimensions.  Some images benefit from a border, some don’t. Some judges like borders, some really don’t like them.  So, ultimately, it’s up to you to decide whether to put a border on your image.

Now you have the formula for deciding how to scale your image, we’ll look at how to save them using different software.  This part assumes you’ve finished editing your image and are happy with it.

Adobe Lightroom

In Lightroom, go to the Library module and select your image.

Adding the Metadata

In the tool bar on the right hand side, scroll all the way down to the “Metadata” section.  In the “Title” box, add the title for your image.  In the “Creator” box, add your name, do not include your membership number or any titles or distinctions, just your name.  If the image is intended for an Annual competition or other competition with categories, in the “Caption” box, you should add the category for your image (Landscape, Portrait, Nature or Pictorial & General), although this is not required for Open competitions.

Exporting (Saving) the Image

Now go to the File menu and select Export.  From the dialog box, choose where you want to save the image, then what to call it.

File Type and Colour Space

In the “File Settings” section you should choose “JPEG” and “sRGB” for Colour Space.  Quality should be quite high, as a general rule 70 is a good sweet spot, but 100 is fine for competitions as the projection software can handle the extra file size.

Image Size

In the “Image Sizing” section check the “Resize To Fit” button and select “Width & Height” from the box, then enter 1920 x 1080 pixels in the other boxes.  This will automatically decide for you which way to scale the image to fit inside the projector’s resolution.  The “Resolution” box doesn’t matter.

Sharpening

In the “Output Sharpening” section, check the “Sharpen For” box and select “Screen” from the drop-down box.  Set the Amount according to taste, “Standard” is the default, “High” is usually ok unless the image has already been sharpened strongly.

Metadata

In the Metadata section make sure “Minimize Embedded Metadata” is NOT selected.

Exporting

If you like you could now save all these settings as a pre-set to reuse by clicking the “Add” button on the left panel and giving the pre-set a name like “WPS Projection Images” or something of that ilk.

Now you’re ready to export, so click the Export button and you’re done!

Adobe Photoshop Elements

With your image open in Elements…

Adding the Metadata

From the File menu, select “File Info“.  On the Description tab, enter the title of your image into “Document Title“.  Enter your name in the “Author” box.  Do not include your membership number or any titles or distinctions; just your name.  If the image is intended for an Annual competition or other competition with categories, you should add the category for your image (Landscape, Portrait, Natural History or Pictorial & General) in the “Description” box.  This is not required for Open competitions.  Select OK to continue.

Resizing the Image

Go to the Image menu and select “Resize and then “Image Size“.  Make sure the “Constrain Proportions” and “Resample Image” checkboxes are selected, and select “Bicubic Sharper” if available, otherwise the default “Bicubic” is fine.  In the “Pixel Dimensions” part at the top of the dialog, follow the ABC rules (at the beginning of these instructions) to work out the scaling.  If you enter one dimension, it will automatically choose the other one for you, so you can easily decide without committing to anything.  When ready, click OK to scale the image.

Setting the Colour Space

From the Image menu, select “Convert Colour Profile” and then “Convert to sRGB Profile“.  What this does is to convert the image to the sRGB colour space which is the default for the Web and for many online printing companies, so if you’ve ever posted an image online or had it printed and the colours came out funny, it’s likely because this step wasn’t done.

From the Image menu, under Mode, the “8 Bits/Channel” setting should be selected, and “RGB Colour” (optionally Grayscale, but RGB works even for B&W).  If the 8 Bit option is not selectable, it’s because you’re already in this mode.

Exporting (Saving) the Image

From the File menu, select “Save As” and choose where to save your image and what to call it.  Select JPEG as the format and tick the option to embed the colour profile (which should be sRGB IEC61966-2.1).  When you click SAVE you’re presented with another dialog, choose “Baseline” as the format options, and choose the quality setting, 7 is a sweet spot, 10 is ok for our competitions as the projection software can handle the large file size.  Click OK and you’re done!

Adobe Photoshop:

With your image open in Photoshop…

Adding the Metadata

From the File menu, select “File Info“.  On the General tab, enter the title of your image into “Document Title“.  Enter your name in the “Author”.  Do not include your membership number or any titles or distinctions; just your name.  If the image is intended for an Annual competition or other competition with categories, in the “Description” box you should add the category for your image (Landscape, Portrait, Natural History or Pictorial & General).  This is not required for Open competitions.  Select OK to continue.

Resizing the Image

Go to the Image menu and select “Resize and then “Image Size“.  Make sure the “Constrain Proportions” and “Resample Image” checkboxes are selected, and select “Bicubic Sharper” if available, otherwise the default “Bicubic” is fine.  In the “Pixel Dimensions” part at the top of the dialog, follow the ABC rules (at the beginning of these instructions) to work out the scaling.  If you enter one dimension, it will automatically choose the other one for you, so you can easily decide without committing to anything.  When ready, click OK to scale the image.

Setting the Colour Space

From the Edit menu select “Convert to Profile“.  If the Source Space section at the top already says “sRGB IEC61966-2.1” then you don’t need to do anything here.  If it doesn’t, select “sRGB IEC61966-2.1” from the RGB dropdown box.  Intent should be “Relative Colourimetric“, “Black Point Compensation” is ON, “Dither” is ON.  Then click OK.  What this does is to convert the image to the sRGB colour space which is the default for the Web and for many online printing companies, so if you’ve ever posted an image online or had it printed and the colours came out funny, it’s likely because this step wasn’t done.

From the Image menu, under Mode, the “8 Bits/Channel” setting should be selected, and “RGB Colour” (optionally Grayscale, but RGB works even for B&W).

Exporting (Saving) the Image

From the File menu, select “Save As” and choose where to save your image and what to call it.  Select JPEG as the format and tick the option to embed the colour profile (which should be sRGB IEC61966-2.1).  When you click SAVE you’re presented with another dialog, choose “Baseline” as the format options, and choose the quality setting, 7 is a sweet spot, 10 is ok for our competitions as the projection software can handle the large file size.  Click OK and you’re done!

 

Annex C

 

Nature Photography Definition

Nature photography is restricted to the use of the photographic process to depict all branches of natural history, except anthropology and archaeology, in such a fashion that a well-informed person will be able to identify the subject material and certify its honest presentation. The story telling value of a photograph must be weighed more than the pictorial quality while maintaining high technical quality. Human elements shall not be present, except where those human elements are integral parts of the nature story such as nature subjects, like barn owls or storks, adapted to an environment modified by humans, or where those human elements are in situations depicting natural forces, like hurricanes or tidal waves. Scientific bands, scientific tags or radio collars on wild animals are permissible. Photographs of human created hybrid plants, cultivated plants, feral animals, domestic animals, or mounted specimens are ineligible, as is any form of manipulation that alters the truth of the photographic statement.

No techniques that add, relocate, replace, or remove pictorial elements except by cropping are permitted. Techniques that enhance the presentation of the photograph without changing the nature story or the pictorial content, or without altering the content of the original scene, are permitted including HDR, focus stacking and dodging/burning. Techniques that remove elements added by the camera, such as dust spots, digital noise, and film scratches, are allowed. Stitched images are not permitted.  All allowed adjustments must appear natural. Colour images can be converted to greyscale monochrome. Infrared images, either direct-captures or derivations, are not allowed.

Images used in Nature Photography competitions may be divided in two classes: Nature and Wildlife.

Images entered in Nature sections meeting the Nature Photography Definition above can have landscapes, geologic formations, weather phenomena, and extant organisms as the primary subject matter. This includes images taken with the subjects in controlled conditions, such as zoos, game farms, botanical gardens, aquariums and any enclosure where the subjects are totally dependent on man for food.

Images entered in Wildlife sections meeting the Nature Photography Definition above are further defined as one or more extant zoological or botanical organisms free and unrestrained in a natural or adopted habitat.  Landscapes, geologic formations, photographs of zoo or game farm animals, or of any extant zoological or botanical species taken under controlled conditions are not eligible in Wildlife sections.  Wildlife is not limited to animals, birds and insects. Marine subjects and botanical subjects (including fungi and algae) taken in the wild are suitable wildlife subjects, as are carcasses of extant species. Wildlife images may be entered in Nature sections of Exhibitions.

See more at: http://rps.org/news/2014/may/nature-definition-agreed#sthash.pWZ3jFx0.dpuf